Graphmatech signs contract with ABB

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After the breakthrough at Uppsala University solving the practical issues with implementing the super-material graphene on an industrial scale, the company Graphmatech was founded. Now the newly established startup signs a contract with ABB, one of the the world’s leading engineering companies in power, automation and robotics technologies.

Graphene is a two-dimensional carbon crystal, one atom thick and the strongest material the world has ever seen. It has extremely high electrical and thermal conductivity and is ultra-light and transparent. Graphene was first isolated, and characterized in 2004 and was rewarded the Nobel prize in 2010. Graphene is expected to revolutionize the power and electronics sectors.

However, the development has so far been held back by implementation issues. Still 10 years after the first synthesis of graphene only very limited industrial applications are available. The problem is that the properties of the material deteriorate when implemented at large industrial scale. Researchers all over the world have struggled with this challenge and after a recent breakthrough at the department of inorganic chemistry-Ångström Laboratory at Uppsala University the company Graphmatech AB was founded.

Graphmatech has now signed a contract with ABB, on a project related to the development of graphene-based composites.

“It is great value for us to work closely with one of the world leading engineering company and get to implement our knowledge on graphene in a real industrial application”, says Dr. Mamoun Taher, CEO of Graphmatech

“Cooperation between startups and large organizations is of great importance and creates great values for partners. On behalf of Graphmatech’s team I would like to thank the team at ABB’s Innovation Growth Hub SynerLeap, for greatly promoting the model of cooperation between startups and ABB.”

Graphmatech was founded in August of 2017 by materials scientist Dr. Mamoun Taher and serial entrepreneur Björn Lindh. The company is a part of the InnoEnergy Highway – Europe’s leading business accelerator specializing in sustainable energy, as well as the ABB innovation growth hub SynerLeap, and has received initial financing from the Swedish Innovation Agency and the Swedish Energy Agency.

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